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Assessing Watchword Type


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Principles of Assessment

In order to determine your Jungian Psychological Type from a Watchword matrix, you need simply to consider the kinds of words written at each key location (these are the eleven word locations within the central rectangle of the matrix).

To begin, you should consider the psychological function (i.e., Sensation, Intuition, Thinking or Feeling) implied by each of your eleven key words. When the functions have been identified, you may examine the psychological attitude that seems to dominate the matrix (i.e., Introversion or Extraversion).

Generally you should aim to identify:

  • The dominant function (e.g., Intuition)
  • The secondary or auxiliary function (e.g., Thinking)
  • The dominant attitude (e.g., Extraversion)

This will enable you to identify your final psychological type as, for example, Extraverted Intuitive Thinking (Intuition Dominant).

When you have done this you may, if you wish, determine your equivalent Myers Briggs (MBTI)® Type.


Assessing the Psychological Functions

In Jung's theory of psychological type, the dominant and auxiliary functions come from different pairs of opposites (Intuition-Sensation, and Thinking-Feeling). This means that Intuition and Sensation can have only Thinking or Feeling as an auxiliary (and vice versa)

To determine your dominant function, consider which one of the following four functions is most strongly indicated by the 11 key words.

To determine your auxiliary function, consider which function from the other pair of opposites is more clearly indicated by the key words.

Sensation

Sensation is suggested when key words refer to concrete objects or to purely physical or sensory experiences. There should be no strong evidence of an emotional or sentimental attraction (repulsion) towards these objects or experiences. Also there should be no clear indication of psychological metaphor or symbolism. Even though a major assumption of the Watchword technique is that seemingly banal, concrete words can represent or symbolize deeper psychological processes, such a possibility should not be immediately apparent to the casual observer.

Examples of Sensation Words

CAR, CHAIR, SHOE, BOOK, CHALK, SNOW, TREE, PIANO, APPLE, TASTE, HOT, HUNGER, LOUD, SHARP, DRY, SMOKY, CANDLE, SHINE, RED, YELLOW

Intuition

Intuition is often the most difficult of the four functions to identify in the Watchword matrix. It is implicated when words reveal a recognition or interpretation of basic processes and inherent possibilities. It thus involves a deeper appreciation of reality than does Sensation. Generally it points to underlying social or psychological phenomena, profound human experiences, or fundamental drives and motives. There is also invariably some indication that the individual is personally and creatively involved with these processes and possibilities to a degree that goes beyond a purely conceptual understanding (cf. Thinking) or straightforward sentimental reaction (cf. Feeling). Intuition is also indicated when there is a strong sense of psychological metaphor or archetypal symbolism in words that might otherwise be considered sensory. This will usually need to be assessed in terms of the overall 'feel' of the matrix.

Examples of Intuition Words

GROWTH, CAREER, AMBITION, ACHIEVEMENT, CREATION, DESTRUCTION, FREEDOM, ADVENTURE, TRAVEL, TRUTH, WISDOM, ENLIGHTENMENT, TIME, ETERNITY, FUTURE, IMAGINATION, FAITH, SACRIFICE

Thinking

Thinking is suggested by words at key locations which are analytical, abstract and conceptual. Such words are generally emotionally neutral or, if emotional, seem to imply a conceptual understanding of the affective dimension rather than an actual feeling response (e.g., 'punishment' rather than 'hurt', 'altruism' rather than 'help', 'attachment' rather than 'boyfriend'). Also there should be no clear indication that concepts have been derived from a deeper probing of reality that attempts to identify fundamental underlying processes or possibilities (cf. Intuition).

Examples of Thinking Words

SIMILAR, DIFFERENT, OPPOSITE, FORM, PATTERN, CIRCULAR, POSITION, HERE, SOMETIMES, MANY, MIDDLE, SUBSET, NEARLY, THEORY, OBJECTIVE, LINK, READING, LIBRARY, QUOTATION

Feeling

Feeling is indicated when key words reflect a personal emotional reaction or sentimental response to the object, person or concept mentioned (e.g., 'mother', 'upset', 'sex', 'dirt', 'happy', 'pet'). The words always clearly imply a sense of liking or dislike (pleasantness or unpleasantness) which should dominate any other considerations.

Examples of Feeling Words

GOOD, BAD, HAPPY, SAD, ENJOY, HATE, PRETTY, LAZY, VIOLENT, ANGRY, LOVE, SMILE, COSY, SCREAM, PANIC, ALONE, DANGER, RAPE, ILL, PERVERT, CONFUSED, MUM, TEDDY, BABY


Assessing the Psychological Attitude

To determine the psychological attitude in your matrix, you should consider whether the primary direction of interest indicated by your key words is in the inner world (thoughts, feelings, impressions, etc.) or in the outer world (other people, work, nature, social realities).

Introversion

Introversion is suggested when key words refer to private, intimate, uncommunicated experience, or to the inner, psychological dimension. There is little reference to, or sense of connection with, the outside world of physical and social events. Instead the words generally imply an attitude of self-absorption and insularity.

Examples of Introverted Words

STUDYING, DESPAIR, SILENCE, HIDDEN, SLEEP, THOUGHTS, MEMORY, HOME

Extraversion

Extraversion is indicated when key words point outward to (or suggest communication with) the physical or social environments. Even though the matrix may mention thoughts, feelings or psychological processes, these are always clearly related to external events, physical objects or shared beliefs.

Examples of Extraverted Words

PARTY, HOLIDAY, TOWN, COLLEAGUE, OUTBURST, TELEPHONE, SPORT, FASHION


Assessing Final Type

To determine your final psychological type, you should combine your attitude with your dominant and auxiliary functions. There are 16 possible types. These are listed in the following table, with their corresponding Myers Briggs® Types.


Watchword TypeMBTI® Type


Extraverted Intuitive Thinking (Intuition Dominant)EN(T)ENTP
Extraverted Intuitive Thinking (Thinking Dominant)ET(N)ENTJ
Extraverted Intuitive Feeling (Intuition Dominant) EN(F)ENFP
Extraverted Intuitive Feeling (Feeling Dominant)EF(N) ENFJ
Extraverted Sensory Thinking (Sensation Dominant)ES(T)ESTP
Extraverted Sensory Thinking (Thinking Dominant)ET(S)ESTJ
Extraverted Sensory Feeling (Sensation Dominant)ES(F)ESFP
Extraverted Sensory Feeling (Feeling Dominant) EF(S)ESFJ
Introverted Intuitive Thinking (Intuition Dominant)IN(T) INTJ
Introverted Intuitive Thinking (Thinking Dominant)IT(N)INTP
Introverted Intuitive Feeling (Intuition Dominant)IN(F)INFJ
Introverted Intuitive Feeling (Feeling Dominant)IF(N)INFP
Introverted Sensory Thinking (Sensation Dominant) IS(T)ISTJ
Introverted Sensory Thinking (Thinking Dominant)IT(S) ISTP
Introverted Sensory Feeling (Sensation Dominant)IS(F)ISFJ
Introverted Sensory Feeling (Feeling Dominant)IF(S)ISFP


Simplified Method (Online test)

If you take the online version of the Watchword Test, you are presented with a simplified way of assessing your psychological type. Each of your key words is shown, together with four pairs of ideas. You are asked to decide which idea in each pair best describes your word. The four pairs of ideas represent the following type polarities (based on the MBTI dimensions).



Polarity Ideas

Introversion (I) -- Extraversion (E) Inner -- Outer
Feeling (F) -- Thinking (T) Feeling -- Reason
Sensation (S) -- Intuition (N) Concrete -- Abstract
Judging  (J) -- Perceiving (P) Static -- Changing


Because this simplified method is based on relatively crude distinctions between the ideas representing each polarity, the final four-letter type you obtain should be considered as a tentative assessment only. However, its accuracy will be improved the more you study and understand the theoretical distinctions that define each of the four polarities.


Reading your Type Characteristics

The following two sites provide explanations and descriptions of the psychological types

M-B Psychological Type

Jungian Psychological Type

 

What if your Watchword Type is "Wrong"?

Because many people first approach their psychological type via the MBTI, there is a understandable tendency to consider the MBTI result as the "correct" assessment and to dismiss any inconsistent result as simply "wrong".

In practice, Watchword Type usually correlates only moderately with MBTI type. This is most likely because it taps into rather different psychological processes.This is explained in more detail in the book but, basically, since the MBTI assesses consciously expressed preferences it is more likely to reflect the acquired, socialized aspect of psychological type. The Watchword Test, on the other hand (because it is a projective measure of performance) is more likely to reflect "natural" or spontaneous tendencies which are more influenced by unconscious processes. Sometimes this means that Watchword Type can be very different from MBTI type.

For these reasons, it can be interesting and informative to reflect on the similarities and differences that you may find between your MBTI and Watchword types.

Also, because of the spontaneous nature of the Watchword Test, you may find that your Watchword Type is more variable than your MBTI Type when tested on different occasions. This can often give insights into your changing psychological situation. For example, a normally thinking type might find that feeling is indicated on the Watchword Test, suggesting that the feeling function is particularly strong at this time.

As Jung himself noted, psychological type is never a static thing.

 

 

 

® Myers Briggs Type Indicator and MBTI are registered trademarks of Consulting Psychologists Press Inc. Oxford Psychologists Press Ltd has exclusive rights to the trademarks in the UK.

  
 
 











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